Love Letter To Mali Part V: Djenne

It’s about a two-hour drive from Mopti to Djenne, which has a big market every Monday.  On the way, we stopped at a village to walk around and meet some more people.  Everyone continued to be super friendly, and I continued to practice my few phrases.

One family let me try grinding the millet (which I was terrible at, and kept spilling the millet out of the mortar!).  The scene of a woman or two standing on a giant mortal with a huge stake as a pistol is ubiquitous.  Sometimes they get fancy and let the stake fly in the air for a second while they clap.

I felt badly when a few people in this village started describing medical issues they or their children were having.  I guess they are used to white people visiting being doctors.  (yes, I still have the “bear necessities” jungle book song playing in my head).

I don’t think I’ve really explained that all these villages we’ve been visiting, including the cities of Timbuktu and Mopti, are made out of mud bricks.  It is like stepping back in time a thousand years — except for the motorcycles…

Oumar was so fun with all the kids.  They just loved him.  And, when he found the older kids (5th graders), he tested their math skills.  They loved it.  And, since he did it in French, I could participate, too.  Lots of fun.

We walked past a Muslim school teaching the Koran as well as all other subjects.  The teacher was very welcoming to me, and had the children stand up and recite two prayers.  But he wouldn’t let me take any photos.  Oumar explained the school was part of a more extreme part of Islam that doesn’t condone any photographs whatsoever.

About 20 minutes or so outside of Djenne, we needed to board a ferry to cross the river.  As we waited for the ferry, there were stalls of merchants selling jewelry, masks, etc.  Everyone is “Mr. Good Price” or “Mrs. Good Price”, and they will give you “the best price” and decree, “c’est pas cher”.  Fun.  I met two guys from Holland who drove here (over 10k kms and 40 days!).  When they heard I was American they asked, “you know you are a potential al Qaeda victim here?”  Um…

Four cars fit on the ferry, and the ride is about ten minutes.  And, of course, there are more merchant stalls on the ferry!

Djenne was great.  First Oumar and I walked through all the alleyways and met some more people.  Then we visited the markets.  So much color and activity and noise.  And it is hot.  And, of course, the roads and sidewalks and all are just dirt.  And there were masses of people, buying and selling fruit, meat, leather goods, jewelry, etc.  I loved it.  We bought little fried kidney bean cakes, which were tasty, and tried a couple of types of berries and nuts.  I was trying to be careful not to put my hands anywhere near my nose, mouth or eyes since I was shaking hands with so many people, and holding babies and such.  But, then I went and touched something and put my finger in my mouth.  Oh well.

In Mopti we had seen a man selling some kind of liquid medicine that will cure:  diabetes, malaria, hemorrhoids, bad breath, fatigue, etc.  In Djenne we saw a man selling talisman and a black powder that will do all of the above, PLUS make you a genius.

At lunch we met another guide name Moussa who was complaining about a “mean old lady” he is in charge of.  I guess she is complaining about everything.  He said:  “why does she need a hot shower?  It’s a hot country.  She’ll be hot soon enough.”  I guess he had a fair point.

After lunch I decided I wanted a talisman.  So we found the magic man, and bought one for good look and protection, and to ward off evil spirits and jealous people.  Then, we found a leatherworker who sealed it in a pouch and made it into an anklet.  I should be all set!

While we were waiting for Oumar, Camara and I posed for some pics with some Fulani hats on and joked around with some of the vendors.

There was a longer line waiting to cross the ferry on the way back.  We had to wait for it to cross and come back 3 or 4 times.  And, of course, the merchants we out in force.  So, we were waiting for quite a while in the heat.  Not as much fun as the first crossing!

It was during the ferry crossings that I bought a lot of the beaded the jewelry I have been wearing lately, to keep the Malian people I met, front and center in my thoughts and prayers.

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